Eight Track Transfers, ½ inch, ¼ inch eight track cassette

January 25, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Creative Audio Works supplies eight track transfers for ½ inch, ¼ inch eight track cassette formats

TascamPlymouth, MA –Creative Audio Works LLC has added ¼ inch eight-track reel-to-reel and eight-track cassette to it growing list of formats supported. Creative Audio Works is devoted to analog archiving and audio restoration has expanded its services to include eight track transfers seeing there was a need by many to archive multitrack recordings from the past.

Head

Creative Audio Works  provides cost effective transfers of analog ½” eight track multitrack recordings using a custom playback head block crafted by John French of  J.R.F. Magnetics designed to reduce drag thus reducing wow and flutter.

Creative Audio Works has also added a reconditioned Fostex M80 ¼ inch eight-track reel-to-reel and a Tascam 238 eight-track cassette to is roster of multitrack decks supported.

Tape baking using our Fisher Scientific 5500 incubator is included in the transfer package.

Creative Audio Works was featured in MIX Magazine’s Class of 2012, as one of the top 20 Hottest Recording/Production studios of the year, around the globe.

Designed by Lou Clarke of Sonic-Space with studio owner Stewart Adam, the design of this multipurpose is studio geared for audio mastering, music mixing, analog transfer, restoration and sound-for-picture production.

Creative Audio Works has a diverse client base which include the band Bedrokk as well as educational institutions such as Harvard University, Brown Univeristy and the University of Michigan.

Creative Audio Works LLC was founded in 2005 after seeing there was a need to preserve recordings from the past.  For more information regarding audio mastering, analog migration and audio restoration, please contact Stewart Adam at Creative Audio Works,

 

Creative Audio Works LLC
15 Bay Colony Drive
Plymouth, MA 02360
[email protected],

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1/2 inch Eight track analog transfer now offered by Creative Audio Works.

August 29, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Creative Audio Works LLC launches ½ inch eight-track analog to digital transfer service.

TascamPlymouth, MA – Creative Audio Works LLC has added ½ inch eight track transfer to it growing list of formats supported. Creative Audio Works is devoted to analog archiving and audio restoration has expanded its services to include ½ inch eight track transfers seeing there was a need by many to archive multitrack recordings from the past.

HeadCreative Audio Works will provide cost effective transfers of analog ½” eight channel multitrack recordings using a custom playback head block crafted by John French of  J.R.F. Magnetics designed to reduce drag thus reducing wow and flutter. Tape baking using our Fisher Scientific 5500 incubator is included in the transfer package.

Creative Audio Works was featured in MIX Magazine’s Class of 2012, as one of the top 20 Hottest Recording/Production studios of the year, around the globe.

Designed by Lou Clarke of Sonic-Space with studio owner Stewart Adam, the design of this multipurpose is studio geared for audio mastering, music mixing, analog transfer, restoration and sound-for-picture production.

Creative Audio Works has a diverse client base which include the band Bedrokk as well as educational institutions such as Harvard University, Brown Univeristy and the University of Michigan.

Creative Audio Works LLC was founded in 2005 after seeing there was a need to preserve recordings from the past.  For more information regarding audio mastering, analog migration and audio restoration, please contact Stewart Adam at Creative Audio Works,

 

Creative Audio Works LLC
15 Bay Colony Drive
Plymouth, MA 02360
[email protected],

 

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The Thrill is Gone, Goodbye to the dynamic gentlemen of the blues.

B. B.King.

In 1979 I was working for Fedco Audio Labs in Providence, RI. Fedco was a 24 track audio remote truck recording live concerts for release on vinyl. The truck had a 22-foot box that was converted to a control room with 2 MCI 24 track recorders, an API console serial number 007 and JBL 4311 monitors.   Some of Fedco’s more famous recordings were Frampton Comes Alive-Peter Frampton, Mad Dogs and Englishman- Joe Cocker, Rock Of Ages-The Band and many more.

In early June Fedco got a call to record an artist at the University Of Mississippi, “Ole Miss”. Bob Dickson and I set out to drive the truck to the gig. Along the way we had a series of minor breakdowns that needed to be fixed. We eventually made it to Tennessee. At about 10AM in the morning we were driving along Route 40 when steam filled the cab. We could barely see out the window. I don’t remember who was driving but we managed to pull off the highway and stop. We called for a tow truck and got hauled to a truck stop for repair. It was a rundown shop with 2 bays and a bunch of old trucks on the property that where in accidents.

It was pretty hot that day – near 90 degrees as I remember. We were hanging around most of the day trying to figure out what was wrong and how to get the truck to the gig the next day. I remember hearing Poco’s song, In the Heart Of The Night on the radio 3 or 4 times that afternoon echoing through the garage.

It was finally determined that the truck would have to be towed the remaining 500 miles. The decision was made to load it onto a lowboy trailer, the kind that is used to tow large construction equipment. While Bob and I where waiting in the office I noticed an all in one stereo system on the floor in the corner, the kind that was a receiver, turntable and 8 track all in one. I saw there was a record on the platter and I took a look to see who it was. I saw a title “Guess Who” and at first I thought it was the band “The Guess Who” from Canada. After taking a second look I realized the name of the album was “Guess Who” and the artist was B. B. King.

The truck was finally loaded onto the lowboy and we set off for the final 500 miles of the trip. Bob and I stayed in the box of the Fedco truck because there was no room in the cab with the tow driver. We where basically locked in the back of the truck for about 8 or 9 hours. We wondered all night if the truck mounted on the lowboy was too tall to fit under any of the bridges. We were waiting to see the roof peal off while we were in there. Fortunately, we made it to Oxford, Mississippi without any accidents.

The next day we set up for the concert and the headline act came onstage around 8PM. The album was released about a year later, B.B. King – Now Appearing: Live at Ole Miss.

Goodbye to the dynamic gentlemen of the blues.

A young B.B King

 

 

 

 

 

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Free Audio Mastering

Creative Audio Works will provide audio mastering free for one song to artists or bands that wish to have their mix mastered

Creative Audio Works LLC
15 Bay Colony Drive
Plymouth, MA 02360
[email protected]

Welcome to Creative Audio Works LLC, your online digital audio mastering studio. We offer high quality audio mastering at an affordable price, adding definition, balance, depth and warmth for CD and digital deliverables.

Call or email Creative Audio Works with any questions you may have about mastering [email protected] or upload your file here through our We Transfer account. Once we receive your composition, we will return your mastered track to you.

What is music mastering? Mastering is the process where an experienced audio mastering engineer uses equipment and software to correct problems within each song and produces a final product that is “label ready” for sending it to the pressing plant, or for digital distribution. A mastering engineer can unify your album with skillful use of EQ, gain, and compression to give it a consistent sound from track to track.

Creative Audio Works LLC will master your final mix in our studio designed by Lou Clark of Sonic Space. Mix Magazine nominated Creative Audio Works studio for “The Best New Studio Of The Year”, Class of 2012.

Our Service Includes:

Audio restoration, removing unwanted noise (clicks, pops, hiss).
• Frequency optimization achieving the right balance and consistency.
• Optimizing average and peak volume levels for proper relative loudness using compression and limiting.
• Trim start and ending of each track (including fades).

For more information about mastering visit our on-line mastering page.

Try us for Free! Yes, We’ll master one of your song for free!
This offer is limited to I song per customer or band.

Naturally, we would like to master more than just one song for you. We think that when you hear the result of your final mix you will see how much we can do to make your music sound the very best it can. This offer is our way of letting people discover the value of our services at no risk.

Call or email Creative Audio Works with any questions you may have about mastering [email protected] or upload your file here through our We Transfer account.

508-747-1858

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Creative Audio Works LLC featured by EVE Audio

Creative Audio Works LLC featured by EVE Audio

Studio Eve 2

Creative Audio Works LLC
15 Bay Colony Drive
Plymouth, MA  02360

Contact [email protected].

Plymouth, MA-Creative Audio Works is pleased to announce that EVE Audio is profiling our studio on their website featuring EVE Audio SC 208 monitors.

Creative Audio Works was featured in MIX Magazine’s Class of 2012, as one of the top 20 Hottest Recording/Production studios of the year, around the globe.

Creative Audio Works LLC was founded in 2005 after seeing there was a need to preserve recordings from the past.  For more information regarding audio mastering, analog migration and audio restoration, please contact Stewart Adam at Creative Audio Works.

Designed by Lou Clarke of Sonic-Space with studio owner Stewart Adam, the design of this multipurpose is studio geared for audio mastering, music mixing, analog transfer, restoration and sound-for-picture production.

Creative Audio Works LLC was founded in 2005 after seeing there was a need to preserve recordings from the past.  For more information regarding audio mastering, analog migration and audio restoration, please contact Stewart Adam at Creative Audio Works.

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Creative Audio Works LLC Launches Online Mastering service.

Creative Audio Works LLC
15 Bay Colony Drive
Plymouth, MA 02360
[email protected],

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Creative Audio Works LLC Launches Online Mastering service.

 

Plymouth, MA – Creative Audio Works LLC has launched its new Online Mastering service.  The website devoted to analog archiving and audio restoration has expanded its services to include Online Mastering for CD and Digital Media on May 21, 2013.

Creative Audio Works Online Mastering for Compact Disc and Digital Media will provide cost effective mastering of new and reissued media. 

 Creative Audio Works was featured in MIX Magazine’s Class of 2012, as one of the top 20 Hottest Recording/Production studios of the year, around the globe.

Designed by Lou Clarke of Sonic-Space with studio owner Stewart Adam, the design of this multipurpose is studio geared for audio mastering, music mixing, analog transfer, restoration and sound-for-picture production.

Recent projects include transfer and restoration of analog tape by the Boston based group Rat Alley.  John Williams wrote to say.

“Stewart did an awesome job on my recordings! Some of my tapes were 30 years old and in bad condition. Stewart was able to repair dropouts and bring the music back (even better than the day it was recorded) Thanks again Stewart!

Other clients include Harvard University, Princeton University and other educational institutions.

Creative Audio Works LLC was founded in 2005 after seeing there was a need to preserve recordings from the past.  For more information regarding audio mastering, analog migration and audio restoration, please contact Stewart Adam at Creative Audio Works,

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Transfers on the table today.

This little truck is getting a lot of milage today.Image

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There was a time when the only portable music for your car was an AM radio.

Just because you’re driving in your car, it doesn’t mean that you can’t take your hi-fi music with you. Here’s a Chrysler innovation: a phonograph for your car.

In 1956 Chrysler teamed with CBS to create the “Highway Hi-Fi” – an under-dash phonograph that played vinyl records at a super-slow 16-2/3 revolutions per minute. The slow speed allowed a small disc to pack up to an hour of entertainment on each side. Special mechanical engineering reduced the number of times and distance the needle would skip across the disc as the car drove over bumps in the road.

Putting such minor practicalities as potholes, speed humps, going round corners, record storage, changing them whilst on the move, we think the concept of a dashboard mounted record player seems a sterling idea and one we approve of immensely. Back in the 1950s radio stations were not as plentiful as today. And if you did not like the choices that were within range about your only option was to suffer through what you could find or shut the radio off and listen to the road, engine noise and the sounds of bugs going splat on the windshields.

Necessity is the mother of invention, well Peter Goldmark of Columbia broadcast system research department came to the rescue in time for the 1956 model release Chrysler Corp. was able to offer new car buyers a choice in their listing pleasure. The players were made to mount on the bottom edge of the dash directly above the transmission hump and plug directly into the car radio (top of the line radio of course). By pressing the button on the front cover of the player the door to the player would be open. The turntable could then be slid out to aid in loading the record. Flip the red switch on the left-hand side of the player and the player is on bypassing the radio tuner.

There were a few problems that needed to be dealt with for the players to work properly in a car environment. Besides the obvious keeping the needle on the record. One of them was safely operating the unit while driving! In order to fit the player had to be small so the 45-rpm record diameter size was ideal. Only one problem you would have to change the record every few minutes, this is not only a chore but also it would be dangerous while going down one of the new superhighways at warp speed. So the new 16 2/3 rpm speed was used (ultra-microgroove) with the 7” format (same as 45s) but this would give extended long play and this also added the benefit that the slower speed was less likely to kick up the needle. And with up to 60 minutes per side of entertainment you could drive quite a distance.

Highway Hi-Fi

If you were to order one of these on your new Chrysler, Desoto, Dodge or Plymouth you received with it the first 6 records in the series in a box set, along with a registration card and order form for more records and a carrying case. Only 36 were available when the option first came out with an additional 6 added in early 1956 for a total of 42 available to the general public. The only other records that were made specifically for this player that were not intended for distribution to the general public were dealer demonstration records.

Highway Hi-Fi could only play records that came with the car, or ones ordered from Columbia, of which there were 36. You could order “Music From Hollywood” by Percy Faith and His Orchestra, a re-enactment of the Battle of Gettysburg or “Symphonic Serenade” by Morton Gould and the Rochester “Pops” Orchestra. But could you buy Kay Starr? No. Perry Como? Elvis Presley? And Highway Hi-Fi records couldn’t be played on a home hi-fi: the records’ special microgrooves were too small for the needles.

By 1957, Highway Hi-Fi had exited to history, to be joined later by eight-track and cassette tapes.
Another automobile record player was manufactured by RCA from 1960 to 1961. This later version dropped the “Highway Hi-Fi” label (not being Chrysler-exclusive) and played  standard 45 RPM 7 records. It, too, suffered a short lifespan: the players were even more prone to malfunction than those manufactured by CBS, and standard 7″ records had their grooves worn down rapidly by the high stylus pressure used to prevent skipping.

It seemed like a good idea at the time.

Of course so did 8 track tapes. Ker-Chunk! 

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Voices From The Past

Here is a short video we did a few years ago showing what types of audio we save for future generations.

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“SOLID MUSIC” Three-Dimensional” Sounds Created

From Science And Mechanics April 1934.

Like pictures on a screen, the best of public-address amplification and loudspeaker reproduction hitherto available has lacked reality. It is not that the instruments are defective in their reproduction of pitch and volume; but the ear is a fairly selective instrument, and hard to deceive when aided by the eyes. The sounds are right, but the directions from which they come are wrong. However, a recent demonstration, staged by telephone engineers, has the astonishing effect of overpowering the testimony of the eyes. Unseen players, singers and dancers seem to move tunefully or noisily across an empty stage.

Not only is the quality of the reproduction high, but each of the multiple speakers used is giving out a different interpretation of the sounds picked up. The result is that the ear, receiving varied sounds from different directions, finds in them a “stereophonic” or “solid-sound” characteristic; just as the eye judges the distances of shapes moving before it.

For years, the idea of binaural or “two-eared” reproduction has been toyed with. Two microphones, located some distance apart, were connected through amplifiers to two loud speakers, one on each side of the audience. Mysterious effects were thus produced, and in many cases amusing, when the positions of the speakers did not correspond to those of the microphones.

But the newest system of “three-dimensional sound” goes further. Several microphones, and several amplifiers, with loud speakers of new design and unusual fidelity, are combined to give unusual effects. For instance, an orchestra is located in a hall on one floor; the loud speakers in an auditorium on another floor. The orchestra seems to the listeners to be present before them; the different instruments to be placed in their proper position. A dancer crosses the floor above; the tap of his shoes is heard crossing the empty stage below in ghostly fashion. It is possible to imitate the passage of a band, as illustrated in our picture. And the acoustic engineers can not only give a faithful reproduction of an orchestra but, with their filters, tone and volume controls, execute variations on it at will. For instance, the voice of a soloist can be amplified independently of an accompanying orchestra, and lifted above it. Electrically, we can have a thousand-piece orchestra. The artistic possibilities of “auditory perspective” are as yet only experimental, but they place a remarkable opportunity before composers and conductors greater, perhaps, than any of the technical improvements in musical instruments of the past.

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